Kniphofia rooperi

///Kniphofia rooperi
Kniphofia rooperi 2014-01-12T15:22:19+00:00

This is the last poker of the season to flower and what a finale it makes.  There is always a point in September when there is no sign of life amongst the dense foliage and  you think that it is not going to flower.  Then fat stems start to push themselves through and within a week they are a metre tall and forming buds.  When the flowers open they are slightly larger than a cricket ball and glow an iridescent orange and yellow.

It originates in the Eastern Cape of South Africa and to grow well needs a sunny spot in moist but well-drained soil.  It hates winter wet.  In northern Europe it rarely sets seed so the best way to propagate it is to divide established clumps in the spring.

Mine are planted amongst the dark-purple flowers of  Aconitum fischeri, the intensity of the colours of both plants complementing each other well.

Kniphofia rooperi with late-flowering Aconitum

Kniphofia rooperi with late-flowering Aconitum

Kniphofia rooperi

Kniphofia rooperi